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System of Government:

Executive:

A '''semi-presidential system''' is a system of government+ in which a president+ exists along with a prime minister+ and a cabinet, with the latter two being responsible to the legislature of a state+. It differs from a parliamentary republic+ in that it has a popularly elected head of state+, who is more than a purely ceremonial figurehead+, and from the presidential system+ in that the cabinet+, although named by the president, is responsible+ to the legislature+, which may force the cabinet to resign through a motion of no confidence+.

While the German Weimar Republic+ (1919–1933) exemplified an early semi-presidential system, the term "semi-presidential" originated in a 1978 work by political scientist Maurice Duverger+ to describe the French Fifth Republic+ (established in 1958), which Duverger dubbed a ''régime semi-présidentiel''.

There are two separate subtypes of semi-presidentialism: premier-presidentialism and president-parliamentarism.

Under the '''premier-presidential''' system, the prime minister and cabinet are exclusively accountable to parliament. The president chooses the prime minister and cabinet, but only the parliament may remove them from office with a ''vote of no confidence''. The president does ''not'' have the right to dismiss the prime minister or the cabinet. However, in some cases, the president can circumvent this limitation by exercising the discretionary power of dissolving the assembly, which forces the prime minister and cabinet to step down. This subtype is used in Burkina Faso+, Georgia+ (since 2013), Lithuania+, Madagascar+, Mali+, Mongolia+, Niger+, Poland+, Portugal+, France+, Romania+, Senegal+ and Ukraine+ (since 2014; previously, between 2006 and 2010).

Under the '''president-parliamentary''' system, the prime minister and cabinet are dually accountable to the president and the assembly majority. The president chooses the prime minister and the cabinet but must have the support of the parliament majority for his choice. In order to remove a prime minister or the whole cabinet from power, the president can dismiss them or the assembly can remove them by a ''vote of no confidence''. This form of semi-presidentialism is much closer to pure presidentialism. It is used in Armenia+, Georgia between 2004 and 2013, Mozambique+, Namibia+, Russia+, Sri Lanka+, Taiwan+ and Ukraine between 1996 and 2005, and again from 2010 to 2014. It was used in Germany+ during the Weimar Republic+, the constitutional regime between 1919 and 1933.

The powers that are divided between president and prime minister can vary greatly between countries.

In '''France+''', for example, in case of cohabitation+ when the president and the prime minister come from opposing parties, the president takes care of foreign policy+ and defence policy+ (these are generally called ''les prérogatives présidentielles'' (the presidential prerogatives)) and the prime minister of domestic policy+ and economic policy+. In this case, the division of responsibilities between the prime minister+ and the president+ is not explicitly stated in the constitution, but has evolved as a political convention+ based on the constitutional principle that the prime minister is appointed (with the subsequent approval of a parliament majority) and dismissed by the president.Le Petit Larousse 2013 p. 880 On the other hand, whenever the president is from the same party as the prime minister who leads the ''conseil de gouvernement'' (cabinet), he often (if not usually) exercises ''de facto'' control over '''all''' fields of policy via the prime minister. It is up to the president to decide, how much "autonomy" he leaves to "his" prime minister to act on his own.

In '''Finland+''', by contrast, the assignment of responsibility for foreign policy was explicitly stated in the pre-2000 constitution+: "foreign policy is led by the president in cooperation with the cabinet".
The incorporation of the elements from both presidential and parliamentary republics brings advantage elements along with them but, however, it also comes with disadvantages related to the confusion about powers.

'''Advantages'''
*Providing cover for the president
*Ability to remove an unpopular prime minister and maintain stability from the president's fixed term
*Additional checks and balances

'''Disadvantages'''
*Confusion about accountability
*Confusion and inefficiency in legislative process
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Semi-presidential systems may sometimes experience periods in which the President and the Prime Minister are from differing political parties. This is called "cohabitation+", a term which originated in France when the situation first arose in the 1980s. Cohabitation can create an effective system of checks and balances+ or a period of bitter and tense stonewalling, depending on the attitudes of the two leader+s, the ideologies of their parties, or the demands of their constituencies.

In most cases, cohabitation results from a system in which the two executives are not elected at the same time or for the same term. For example, in 1981, France elected both a Socialist+ president and legislature, which yielded a Socialist premier. But whereas the president's term of office was for seven years, the National Assembly+ only served for five. When, in the 1986 legislative election, the French people elected a right-centre Assembly, Socialist President Mitterrand+ was forced into cohabitation with rightist premier Jacques Chirac+.

However, in 2000, amendments to the French Constitution reduced the length of the French President's term from seven to five years. This has significantly lowered the chances of cohabitation occurring, as parliamentary and presidential elections may now be conducted within a shorter span of each other.


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*List of countries by system of government+
*Parliamentary system+
*Presidential system+

Reflist:
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* Elgie, Robert+ (2011). "Semi-Presidentialism: Sub-Types And Democratic Performance". ''Comparative Politics''. (Oxford Scholarship Online Politics) OUP Oxford ISBN 9780199585984
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* Passarelli, Gianluca (2010). (PDF). ''French Politics'' (2010) '''8''': 402–428. Dipartimento di Scienza Politica, University of Bologna+.
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* Shugart, Matthew Søberg+ (September 2005). . Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego+.
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*, United Nations Development Programme (n.d.). .
*, blog of Robert Elgie+
* blog with posts written by several political scientists, including Robert Elgie.

Authority control:

Semi-presidential system+ A semi-presidential system is a system of government in which a president exists along with a prime minister and a cabinet, with the latter two being responsible to the legislature of a state.